The Snow Miners – a Dedication

The Snow Miners – a Dedication 
By James Doody

Preamble by
Arthur Topham

Having just spent the day shovelling my long, and at spots, wide driveway, I got to thinking about snow shovelling and Barkerville the famous Cariboo Gold Rush town that sprang up along Williams Creek back in the 1860s. It brought to mind a small chapter from a book written by a friend of mine, James Doody, that is rather apropo for this time of the year.

James Doody walked into Barkerville in the fall of 1931 and ended up falling head over heels in love with the Post Mistress at the Barkerville post office, Violet Rankin who he soon married. Jim was a gold miner in the area and a writer and after marrying his sweetheart he proceeded to built a log cabin for their future home. The cabin is still standing in Barkerville today and is now known as the schoolhouse.

Jim and Violet Doody’s home in Barkerville

His first book, The Romance of the Cariboo Proper was printed in Quesnel back in 1982 and is a wonderful collection of stories about life in and around Barkerville. The Snow Miners is a small chapter dedication to Jim and Violet’s only son who, unfortunately, died at an early age while still in Barkerville.

I first met James (Jim) back in 1987 while I was the Park Supervisor at 10 Mile Lake Provincial Park. After Jim and Violet had left Barkerville in their later years they purchased a large section of lake shore property on 10 Mile Lake just north of Quesnel and off Highway 97. He and Violet graciously donated the land to the provincial government for the park itself and they lived next door along the lake. Jim passed away in the early 90s after an unfortunate and fatal tractor accident.

The Snow Miners – a Dedication
By James Doody

From The Romance of the Cariboo Proper

Snow miner, I have not forgotten.

And then came the snow, the beautiful clean white snow, and it piled up and up and up.

Very early each morning as the dog star was on the wane, we could be seen with our lunch pails going to work in our snow mine.

Outside the wind blew, the snow drifted and it got colder and colder, but we continued working in our tunnels, cross cuts, drifts, raises and stopes. Then all too soon came a “you-who” from the mine portal. We would put on our jackets, pick up our lunch pails and make our way outside, there to be greeted by our loved ones. On our way home we could see the first quarter moon as it slanted up and over Greenberry Mountain.

While we were eating our evening meal Mother would say, “Are you kids quite sure that it is safe for you to work in your snow mine?”

“Mother dear,” we would reply, “do not concern yourself about our safety for we are professional snow miners!”

~Ω~

Province-wide restrictions in B.C. as of April 1, 2021


Province-wide restrictions

Provincial restrictions are in place to help stop the spread of COVID-19. Some restrictions are made by the Provincial Health Officer (PHO) under the Public Health Act and others are made under the Emergency Program Act (EPA). Most orders can be enforced by police and compliance and enforcement officials.

Last updated: April 1, 2021

On this page:

Do your part to keep B.C. safe

Stronger province-wide restrictions

Between March 29 at 11:59 pm and April 19 at 11:59 pm the PHO is strengthening province-wide restrictions:

  • The variance allowing indoor religious gatherings and worship services between March 28 and May 13 is suspended
  • Indoor low intensity group exercise classes are cancelled
  • Restaurants, pubs and bars are closed for indoor dining. Outdoor patio seating and take-out or delivery is allowed
  • Whistler Blackcomb ski resort is closed

Safety recommendations

In addition to the orders, the PHO strongly recommends:

  • Working from home whenever possible, unless it is essential to be in the workplace
  • Keeping your child home from school if they feel sick or have any sign of illness
  • Getting testing immediately if you or anyone in your family feels sick
  • Avoiding all non-essential travel

Masks in schools

All K to 12 staff and all students in grades 4 to 12 are required to wear non-medical masks in all indoor areas, including:

  • At their work stations (desks)
  • On school buses
  • Within and outside learning groups

PHO order on gatherings and events

This content is a summary of the PHO order – Gatherings and Events (PDF) document. It is not legal advice and does not provide an interpretation of the law. In the event of any conflict or difference between this webpage and the order, the order is correct and legal and must be followed. 

Social gatherings

Indoor gatherings

No indoor social gatherings of any size at your residence with anyone other than your household or, if you live alone, your core bubble. For example:

  • Do not invite friends or extended family inside your residence or vacation accommodation
  • Do not host a party or event inside your house

Outdoor gatherings

Up to 10 people can gather outdoors. For example:

  • Up to 10 people can gather at a park or beach
  • Up to 10 people can gather in the backyard of a residence

Do not gather with several groups of new people. Stick to the same people. Continue to use COVID-19 layers of protection and maintain physical distancing. Patios and outdoor areas at restaurants, pubs and bars are not included as places to gather with 10 people at one table.

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Core bubble

Co-parenting and legal parenting arrangements

Supporting family members or isolated people

University students

Visiting people who live alone

Gatherings and events by sector

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Cultural events and gatherings

Drive-in and drop-off events

Formal meetings

Indoor funerals, weddings and baptisms

Indoor religious gatherings and worship services

Meals for people in need

Outdoor funerals

Outdoor religious gatherings and worship services

Perimeter seating vehicles and buses (limo and party bus)

Rental and home sale viewings

Retail businesses, vending markets and episodic markets

Workplaces

Youth extracurricular activities

Activities allowed under the order

These activities are not considered a social gathering:

  • Going for a walk or hike
  • Parents carpooling kids to and from school
  • Grandparents providing child care
  • Public pools and public skating rinks, when not associated with an event, are allowed to continue to operate with a COVID-19 Safety Plan

****ALL EXERCISE RULES AND REGS ARE EXCLUDED FROM THIS REPORT

PHO order on restaurants, pubs and bars

Restaurants, pubs, bars and food courts are closed for indoor dining until April 19 at 11:59 pm.

  • Outdoor patio seating and take-out or delivery is allowed
  • Breweries, wineries and tasting rooms can operate outdoor patios
  • Liquor may only be served on a patio if people are seated

In order to limit the spread of COVID-19, people should only be dining at restaurants with their household. For people who live alone, this should be with a maximum of two people they regularly interact with (core bubble).

Restaurants, pubs and bars must have a COVID-19 Safety Plan and employee protocols in place. WorkSafeBC will be conducting inspections to verify that COVID-19 Safety Plans remain effective. Establishments that are noncompliant with plan requirements may face orders and fines, and possible referral to public health which may result in a closure order.

EPA order on masks in public indoor settings

As outlined in the EPA mask mandate order, masks are required for everyone in many public indoor settings. A face shield is not a substitute for a mask as it has an opening below the mouth.

There are exemptions for:

  • People with health conditions or with physical, cognitive or mental impairments who cannot wear one
  • People who cannot remove a mask on their own
  • Children under the age of 12
  • People who need to remove their masks to communicate due to another person’s hearing impairment

Masks are required in many indoor public settings and all retail stores. This includes:

  • Malls, shopping centres
  • Grocery stores
  • Airports
  • Coffee shops
  • On public transportation, in a taxi or ride-sharing vehicle
  • Places of worship
  • Libraries
  • Common areas of post-secondary institutions, office buildings, court houses (except court rooms), hospitals and hotels
  • Clothing stores
  • Liquor stores
  • Drug stores
  • Community centres
  • Recreation centres
  • City Halls
  • Restaurants, pubs and bars when not seated at a table
  • Sport or fitness facilities when not working out

Mask enforcement

You could be subject to a $230 fine if you:

  • Do not wear a mask in an indoor public setting, unless you are exempt
  • Refuse to comply with the direction of an enforcement officer, including the direction to leave the space
  • Engage in abusive or belligerent behaviour

Masks at workplaces and shared living areas

It is strongly recommended that masks be worn in the following areas:

  • Common areas in apartment buildings and condos, including:
    • Elevators
    • Hallways
    • Lobbies
    • Stairwells
  • Shared indoor workplace spaces, including:
    • Elevators
    • Kitchens
    • Hallways
    • Break rooms

Travel advisory

At this time, all non-essential travel should be avoided. This includes travel into and out of B.C. and between regions of the province. For example:

  • Do not travel for a vacation
  • Do not travel to visit friends or family outside of your household or core bubble

Travel for essential reasons

Individual circumstances may affect whether a trip is considered essential or non-essential. Essential travel within B.C. includes:

  • Regular travel for work within your region
  • Travel for things like medical appointments and hospital visits

For example, if you live in Vancouver and work in Surrey you can continue to commute. 

If you need to travel for essential reasons, take the same health and safety precautions you do at home.

  • Wash your hands often
  • Practice safe distancing, 2 m
  • Travel only with yourself, household or core bubble
  • Stick to the outdoors whenever possible
  • Clean spaces often
  • Wear a mask in indoor spaces

First Nations communities

Many First Nations have declared a state of emergency for their communities and enacted COVID-19 community protection by-laws including travel bans for non-residents and non-essential visitors. It is important to respect these restrictions in addition to the province-wide travel advisory. 

Whistler Blackcomb closure

The Whistler Blackcomb ski resort is closed until April 19 at 11:59 pm.

Coming from outside of B.C.

At this time, people travelling to B.C. from another province or territory within Canada should only come for essential reasons. If you do travel, you are expected to follow the same travel guidelines as everyone else in B.C.

Enforcement

During a public health emergency under the Public Health Act, the PHO can make orders as needed. You must follow the orders. Some orders can be enforced by police or other compliance and enforcement officials. People who don’t follow these orders could be fined.